PRIDE

100% of proceeds from the sale of these two canvases will go to the LGBT Foundation. 

The Pride canvases are interpretations of UK Artist Chuck Elliott's beautiful piece, titled Pride. The print was created in 2019 for the LGBT Foundation and ran as a limited print at the Blackwater Gallery for 12 months. I saw Chuck's work while browsing instagram, and immediately knew I wanted to turn it into a needlepoint pillow! Thankfully, he agreed!  

PRIDE Clutch

Created in collaboration with LauraLove Designs and Chuck Elliott for the LBGT Foundation, all proceeds from sales of this canvas will be donated to the charity. Painted area measures 10" x 7" Canvas size is 12" x 10" Un-finished canvas only, threads not included. Please note: this is a PRE-ORDER. Canvas will be delivered in Autumn. 

$100.00

PRIDE pillow

Created in collaboration with LauraLove Designs and Chuck Elliott for the LBGT Foundation, all proceeds from sales of this canvas will be donated to the charity. Painted area measures 12" x 12" Canvas size is 15" x 15" Un-finished canvas only, threads not included. Please note: this is a PRE-ORDER. Canvas will be delivered in Autumn. 

$175.00

    Laura's story:

    I feel like everyone knows what the "LGB" in LGBT stands for. But how many really know or understand the "T"?

    I didn't, not really. Nor did my ex, and that "T" ended up changing both our lives.

    I got married a few years ago. My spouse at the time was really struggling with their mental health, but I thought it was just the stress of adjusting to living together after a long-term international long-distance relationship, work, and all the other stressors life throws at you.

    It wasn't that, though.

    A few short months after the wedding, my spouse, J, came out as transgender, and I suddenly learned how little I really knew about that "T".

    We ended up divorcing, and that could have been the end for me. I could have used this experience as an excuse to become angry and resentful, but that just doesn't make sense to me. I won't lie and say I wasn't hurt, or that I wasn't angry-but I believe those are natural responses to any relationship ending unexpectedly. It took time, but with distance I can now say that I support J 100%.

    J and I have kept in contact, and she is so happy and confident now. She is a whole, complete person, compared to who she was before. Not to say she wasn't a person!!! Just, that like the pride flag, or Chuck's artwork, her personality has so many facets and colours that before were dulled by the pain of fulfilling a gender role she was unhappy in.

    I'm sharing my story because it's important to bring visibility to the "T" in LGBT that isn't the hateful rhetoric so prevalent in the news today. Transgender isn't new-- trans people have existed throughout history, and they occupy roles in all spaces-from athletes to actors, to teachers and friends. If J or I had really known or understood what it meant to be Transgender, what would our story be? Would we have even gotten married, or would J have recognised her dysphoria much earlier? Who knows.

    All I can do now is be the best ally I can be, and use my voice and whatever platform I can - in this case, needlepoint--to bring awareness to the letter T. 

    An excerpt from Chuck Elliott about Pride

    What can I tell you about Pride that you don't already know?

    I guess all I can really do is write a few thoughts about my own experiences of the community, and how that has affected my own life, and the way I think.

    Number one on my list would be to recall with real fondness a gay friend of our family who was brutally murdered by homophobic thugs in his own home a good number of years ago now. That event resonates to this day, of course. He is still missed, and should be here with us now.

    Reading Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City and day dreaming of being an artist working and living in San Fransisco. That city's culture, counter culture and scene has informed all of my work, to this day. Most obviously in pieces like Sun : Moon : Cosmos {67}

    My beautiful older brother told me he knew he was gay from the age of 2. I've never had any reason to doubt that. So although I am cis, and straight, my experience of growing up with him has always been to be surrounded by gay men, and gay culture. It's been a very beautiful prism to refract my own childhood through.

    As recently as 2019, I saw the Pride parade come through central Bristol, on the way to the downs, and couldn't help but be totally in awe of the diversity and beauty of the people who make up the movement. it seems to me that the world has become a far more beautiful place since we started to walk away from the hate and intolerance of previous generations.